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Into the Wild

by Jon Krakauer

Audiobook

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In April 1992 a young man from a well-to-do family hitchhiked to Alaska and walked alone into the wilderness north of Mt. McKinley. His name was Christopher Johnson McCandless. He had given $25,000 in savings to charity, abandoned his car and most of his possessions, burned all the cash in his wallet, and invented a new life for himself...
"Terrifying...Eloquent...A heart-rending drama wandering of human yearning."—The New York Times
"A narrative of arresting force. Anyone who ever fancied wandering off to face nature on its own harsh terms should give a look. It's gripping stuff."—The Washington Post

Expand title description text
Publisher: Penguin Random House Audio Publishing Group
Edition: Unabridged

OverDrive Listen audiobook

  • ISBN: 9780739358054
  • File size: 205028 KB
  • Release date: August 7, 2007
  • Duration: 07:06:35

MP3 audiobook

  • ISBN: 9780739358054
  • File size: 205028 KB
  • Release date: August 7, 2007
  • Duration: 07:06:35
  • Number of parts: 6


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0 of 2 copies available
10 people waiting per copy

Formats

OverDrive Listen audiobook
MP3 audiobook

subjects

Travel Nonfiction

Languages

English

Levels

In April 1992 a young man from a well-to-do family hitchhiked to Alaska and walked alone into the wilderness north of Mt. McKinley. His name was Christopher Johnson McCandless. He had given $25,000 in savings to charity, abandoned his car and most of his possessions, burned all the cash in his wallet, and invented a new life for himself...
"Terrifying...Eloquent...A heart-rending drama wandering of human yearning."—The New York Times
"A narrative of arresting force. Anyone who ever fancied wandering off to face nature on its own harsh terms should give a look. It's gripping stuff."—The Washington Post

Expand title description text