Error loading page.
Try refreshing the page. If that doesn't work, there may be a network issue, and you can use our self test page to see what's preventing the page from loading.
Learn more about possible network issues or contact support for more help.

The Man Who Knew Too Much

ebook

Horne Fisher is "The Man Who Knew Too Much" in these eight stories. In the final story, "The Vengeance of the Statue," Fisher notes: "The Prime Minister is my father's friend. The Foreign Minister married my sister. The Chancellor of the Exchequer is my first cousin." Because of these intimate relationships with the leading political figures in the land, Fisher knows too much about the private politics behind the public politics of the day. This knowledge is a burden to him in the eight stories, because he is able to uncover the injustices and corruptions of the murders in each story, but in most cases the real killer gets away with the killing because to bring him openly to justice would create a greater chaos: starting a war, inciting Irish rebellions or removing public faith in the government...


Expand title description text
Publisher: Otbebookpublishing Edition: Revised

Kindle Book

  • Release date: October 1, 2015

OverDrive Read

  • ISBN: 9783956760822
  • Release date: October 1, 2015

EPUB ebook

  • ISBN: 9783956760822
  • File size: 598 KB
  • Release date: October 1, 2015

Formats

Kindle Book
OverDrive Read
EPUB ebook

subjects

Fiction Literature

Languages

English

Horne Fisher is "The Man Who Knew Too Much" in these eight stories. In the final story, "The Vengeance of the Statue," Fisher notes: "The Prime Minister is my father's friend. The Foreign Minister married my sister. The Chancellor of the Exchequer is my first cousin." Because of these intimate relationships with the leading political figures in the land, Fisher knows too much about the private politics behind the public politics of the day. This knowledge is a burden to him in the eight stories, because he is able to uncover the injustices and corruptions of the murders in each story, but in most cases the real killer gets away with the killing because to bring him openly to justice would create a greater chaos: starting a war, inciting Irish rebellions or removing public faith in the government...


Expand title description text